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Events
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Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Adults With Cardiovascular Risk Factors) External Exit Disclaimer
August, 2014


Education and Health: New Frontiers (Meeting Summary) External Exit Disclaimer
August 25, 2014


Wireless Health 2014 - Call for Submissions External Exit Disclaimer
Deadline: September 15, 2014


Emotional Stress a Stronger Risk Factor for Heart Disease in Women Compared To Men External Exit Disclaimer
July 31, 2014


NHLBI Request for Information(RFI): Collaborative Translational Research Consortium to Develop T4 Translation of Evidence-based Interventions (NOT-HL-14-028) External Exit Disclaimer
Released July 2, 2014


  More News >>

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October 29 - 31, 2014
Wireless Health 2014External Exit Disclaimer
Bethesda, MD


November 3, 2014
8 am - 5 pm ET.
mHealth Training: Developing Mobile Health Interventions to Treat Pediatric Obesity
Boston Convention and Exhibition Center 

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Home > News and Events > Events Calendar


Events



Upcoming Events

Wireless Health 2014 
October 29 - 31, 2014
NIH, Bethesda

The Wireless Health annual conference series convenes the vanguard international research communities in Wireless technologies and mobile health research. Wireless Health 2014, hosted this year at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, invites cutting edge wireless, connected and mobile health research from engineering, computer science, biomedical and health disciplines. continue...


mHealth Training: Developing Mobile Health Interventions to Treat Pediatric Obesity 
November 3, 2014
Boston Convention and Exhibition Center

Returning for the second time, this successful training offers a primer on the use of mobile health (mHealth) for obesity treatment in the medical setting. This scenario-based training provides education in mHealth research that has both a clear public health and clinical perspective. During the training, attendees will be given a scenario to address obesity treatment in a sample of pediatrics affected by both obesity and high blood pressure. Each presentation will be followed by a hands-on experience in a small group where participants, under the mentorship of faculty, will iteratively develop a mHealth intervention. Register today! continue...




Past Events

NIH mHealth Distinguished Speaker Webinar Series: From a Sugar Rush to a Connected Health High 
September 17, 2014, 1pm -2pm EST
Webinar

Years of research in diabetes self-management has suggested that many adults with the disease are not optimally managing their blood glucose control or the other parameters that affect their disease such as medications and lifestyle. The reasons for these self-management difficulties are numerous and include, but are not limited to: misinformation or spotty health literacy, poor adherence to medications, a lack of timely and contextually-relevant feedback, and the absence of a personalized coaching system. Without supports such as these, it is a challenge for people to manage their complex regimen. This webinar will describe the development of the BlueStar diabetes system. For anecdotes, BlueStar is the first and only mobile prescription therapy: that is, a mobile software solution that has 1) published significant outcomes in cluster randomized control studies, 2) been cleared by the FDA, and 3) is prescribed by a healthcare provider, dispensed by a pharmacy and reimbursed by a health insurance plan. continue...


BSSR-CC Lecture Series: Epidemiology and Cost of Dementia 
September 12, 2014
BSSR-CC Lecture Series
Natcher Conference Center, Balcony B, Bethesda

NIH mHealth Distinguished Speaker Webinar Series: Smart and Connected Health - A Joint NSF/NIH Initiative 
September 9, 2014
Webinar

The Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have identified Smart and Connected Health (SCH; NSF-13-543) as a research priority. SCH was designed to address the need for the next generation of health and healthcare technology research through advances in the understanding of and applications in information science, technology, behavior, cognition, sensors, robotics, bioimaging and engineering. The purpose of this webinar is to explore this interagency program announcement and identify examples of the type of projects that have been funded through the program. continue...


2014 Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health
July 20-25, 2014
Babson Park, MA

Harvard University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, with support from the National Institutes of Health (National Cancer Institute, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Mental Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, Office of Disease Prevention), and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, are sponsoring this 5-day training institute to provide participants with a thorough grounding in conducting dissemination and implementation research in health. Faculty and guest lecturers will consist of leading experts (practitioners and teachers) in theory, implementation and evaluation approaches to D&I, creating partnerships and multi-level, transdisciplinary research teams, research design, methods and analyses appropriate for D&I investigations and conducting research at different and multiple levels of intervention (e.g., clinical, community, policy). continue...


NIH/OppNet Conversations on Culture: Present and Future Efforts in Basic, Neuroscience, and Translational Research External Exit Disclaimer
August 7, 2014
APA Hospitality Suite, tbn 

Sheba George, Shinobu Kitayama, John McGowan, Stephen Suomi and Lawrence Yang will discuss their findings, answer questions and mentor participants in writing successful grant applications. Officials from the National Institutes of Health’s OppNet program will participate as well. continue...


Wireless Health 2014 External Exit Disclaimer
October 29 - 31, 2014
Nationa Insitutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

The Wireless Health annual conference series convenes the vanguard international research communities in Wireless technologies and mobile health research. Wireless Health 2014, hosted this year at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, invites cutting edge wireless, connected and mobile health research from engineering, computer science, biomedical and health disciplines... continue...


NIH mHealth Distinguished Speaker Webinar Series: What is in the Toolbox? Mobile Health Solutions for Rehabilitation Medicine
June 30, 2014 , 3pm - 4pm EDT
Webinar

This presentation will cover a range of mHealth applications that supports the home health phase of rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury, amputee care and psychological stress. Topics include sleep assessment, cognitive training, vestibular and ocular training for TBI, and prosthetic mHealth tools for amputees. A comprehensive approach that focuses on individualized, self-management applications will be stressed.. continue...


NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: mHealth-Enhanced Support from Informal Caregivers Improves Medication Adherence Across Three Chronic Conditions
June 4, 2014 , 12-1pm EST
Webinar

Although telemonitoring-assisted care management improves outcomes in many chronic conditions, creative strategies are needed to overcome logistical limitations in available personnel, health care finances, and technical support. Additionally, patients’ in-home caregivers are often overburdened, prone to burnout, and coping with their own medical conditions. Recent and ongoing projects at the University of Michigan (Center for Center for Managing Chronic Disease, and the Department of Family Medicine) have used mobile health (mHealth) technologies to enable informal caregiver from outside the patient’s home to support their medication adherence and self-management in real time. In this mHealth system, patients with diabetes, heart failure, or depression undergo weekly automated telephonic health assessments during which they hear problem-tailored messages about adherence and self-management. Their informal caregiver (a designated close friend or family member from outside their home) receives corresponding guidance on how to support the patient’s self-management, while their clinician is notified about any medically-urgent situations. Our preliminary trials show that, compared to basic telemonitoring,incorporating informal caregivers into this system enhances medication adherence and illness self-management behaviors. If ultimately shown effective in our ongoing NIH-funded RCTs, then these and similar mHealth programs could be broadly implemented, have major public health impact, and be expanded to simultaneously address multiple chronic conditions. continue...


The 7th Matilda White Riley Award and Lecture in Behavioral and Social Sciences: Smoking, Obesity and U. S. Longevity
June 3, 2014 , 1-3pm EST
Natcher Building, Balcony B

Since 1960, the mortality profiles of industrialized countries have been dominated by the chronic diseases of adulthood. The intensity of these diseases reflects many factors, including scientific understanding of disease etiology, access to and performance of health care systems, levels of education and income, and individual behaviors affecting health. This paper examines mortality levels in the United States and other industrialized countries since 1960 and considers the extent to which smoking and obesity are contributors to trends, international differences, and internal disparities. continue...


BSSR-CC Lecture Series: Culture, Research, and Health Outcomes Panel  
May 23, 2014, 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT.
BSSR-CC Lecture Series


BSSR-CC Lecture Series: Emotional Factors and Cardiovascular Disease: Differences by Sex and Age 
May 16, 2014, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT
BSSR-CC Lecture Series

There is growing recognition of the importance of emotional stress as a potentially modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Emotional stress potentially contributes to CVD in multiple ways, from influencing CVD risk factors, to affecting the development of atherosclerosis, to triggering acute CVD events, to impairing recovery, prognosis and quality of life of patients who have already developed the disease. Emerging evidence suggests that young individuals, young women in particular, are especially vulnerable to the adverse effects of stress on the cardiovascular system, which may result in earlier onset of CVD or more adverse prognosis if the disease is already manifest. Women’s susceptibility to psychosocial stress could play a role in sex differences in the pathophysiology and outcome of CVD. For example, it could help explain the higher propensity of women toward microvascular dysfunction, which has been linked to emotional stress. It could also explain why young women with an acute myocardial infarction have twice the mortality than men of the same age despite less severe coronary disease. Future research should study women and men earlier in their life to better understand the risk pathways linking emotional stress to CVD risk and devise successful interventions to ameliorate such risk.


NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Measurement Adherence
May 5, 2014 , 12-1pm EST
Webinar

The accurate measurement of adherence is critical for understanding the efficacy of new treatments and the association between patient behavior and health outcomes. Clinically, adherence information can be used to identify at-risk patients as well as a component of interventions either to identify doses most like to be missed or to reinforce positive changes in health behaviors. There are many approaches to measuring adherence, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. This presentation will discuss the pros and cons of each approach using illustrations from current research from various chronic illnesses. Greater attention will be given to objective monitoring strategies, which are becoming increasing more feasible with advances in technology. Challenges and recommendations for managing the large databases created by electronic monitoring will be discussed. Finally, strategies for using electronic monitoring in clinical care will be presented. continue...


NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Medication Adherence Essentials 
April 9, 2014 , 2-3pm EST
Webinar

Medication adherence plays a critical role in prevention and treatment; nevertheless, the burden of non-adherence remains high. There are effective interventions to improve adherence and to measure the impact of those interventions that can be used in a practical setting. This talk is designed to describe those methods and interventions, and to demonstrate the critical role they play in improving medication adherence, especially in primary care. It also provides tools and resources for enhancing adherence. continue...


BSSR-CC Lecture Series: New Technologies and Behavior Change Interventions: What Can They Do for Each Other?
March 24, 2014,  2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST
BSSR-CC Lecture Series

New mHealth technologies are proliferating at an astonishing rate, with many new tools being harnessed for behavior change interventions. Because they are inexpensive, transportable, and have broad (and growing) penetration, mHealth tools (e.g., smartphone apps, text messaging, accelerometers/pedometers) have the potential to overcome access barriers and extend the reach of behavioral interventions to the large population that may benefit. The co-emergence of new mHealth tools and new, efficient methodologies for intervention development creates an opportunity to design behavioral interventions more systematically than the traditional “kitchen sink” approach. The presenter will illustrate via a series of studies of behavioral interventions designed to produce positive diet and activity changes and/or weight loss by fostering self-monitoring, a robust mediator of behavior change. The results highlight the need for a clear theoretical conceptualization of how to align mHealth self-monitoring tools with established effective intervention components, such as social support and financial incentives. Developments in sensor technology will soon afford access to continuous, passively acquired, accurate information about behavioral parameters including dietary intake and physical activity. The field urgently needs a theoretical model to characterize mechanisms whereby self-monitoring performed via these new technological capabilities can be expected to influence behavior. A key question will be whether new automated self-monitoring capabilities support maintenance of healthy lifestyle change by making self-regulation less burdensome, or whether they thwart maintenance by eliminating the need to exercise effortful cognitive processes that are integral to self-regulation. continue...


NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Rethinking Adherence 
March 13, 2014
Webinar

Medication adherence plays a critical role in prevention and treatment; nevertheless, the burden of non-adherence remains high. There are effective interventions to improve adherence and to measure the impact of those interventions that can be used in a practical setting. This talk is designed to describe those methods and interventions, and to demonstrate the critical role they play in improving medication adherence, especially in primary care. It also provides tools and resources for enhancing adherence. continue...


OPPNET- Geospatial Frontiers in Health & Health Behaviors Research: Key Pathways Forward
March 6, 2014, 12:30pm - 1:30pm. NIH Campus, Natcher Center, Balcony A

Speakers:
Dr. Douglas Richardson
Executive Director,
Association of American Geographers

Dr. Mei-Po Kwan
Professor, Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Complex Systems, Health Disparities & Population Health: Building Bridges
February 24 -25, 2014

View Dr. Patricia Mabry's Presentation (PDF 4.20MB)

Improving population health and eliminating health disparities is a critical task, yet our efforts are stymied by the complexity of the task, involving as it does causes of poor health that range from public policy to the nature of our neighborhoods to how we behave to biology.

On February 24-25, 2014, at the National Institutes of Health Natcher Conference Center in Bethesda, Maryland, join scholars and practitioners from the United States and abroad to learn about and see examples of how complex systems science can help guide our research and policy efforts to eliminate health disparities and improve the health of our population. continue...


NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Lessons from “Script Your Future”
January 8, 2014, 1-2pm EST
Webinar

The Script Your Future campaign is a national public education campaign designed to raise awareness among patients, their family caregivers and health care professionals, about the importance of taking medications as directed. Led by the National Consumers League, the campaign focuses on patients affected by three serious chronic conditions – diabetes, respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease. The campaign educates patients about the consequences of poor adherence, encourages patients and health care professionals to better communicate about medication, and offers tools and resources to help improve adherence. continue...


BSSR-CC Lecture Series: Post-Disaster Resilience: Lessons Learned from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill
December 20, 2013
BSSR-CC Lecture Series

The psychological and behavioral consequences of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster may be among the most widespread, long term and costly of all oil spill-related impacts. However, many people are resilient, and understanding the factors associated with better recovery are needed to guide prevention and early intervention activities. Toward this end, a cohort of NE Gulf Coast residents were studied with standard psychological, psychosocial, and risk perception measures during the oil spill and for one, two, and three years thereafter. continue...


OBSSR Twitter Chat: Careers in Behavioral and Social Sciences
December 13, 2013
Twitter Chat

Pursuing a career in behavior, psychology or public health? Wondering where to look for a job or which job’s the best fit for you? Participate in the Twitter Chat on Careers in Behavioral Sciences sponsored by the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health.continue...


NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Physical activity adherence after breast cancer diagnosis
November 6, 2013
Webinar

Physical activity adherence is of particular importance for breast cancer survivors because more physically active breast cancer survivors have a lower risk of breast cancer recurrence and mortality. Furthermore, national survivorship guidelines recommend that oncologists routinely advise their patients to engage in regular physical activity. Unfortunately, the majority of breast cancer survivors do not adhere to the recommended amounts of physical activity. I will discuss the current state of the science related to physical activity adherence in this population including strategies that have proven effective in randomized controlled trials. I will also discuss how this current scientific knowledge may be applicable to other chronic disease states and future research directions in the field. continue...

Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health
June 3 - 7, 2013
St. Louis, Missouri

One of the most critical issues impeding improvements in public health today is the enormous gap between what we know can optimize health and healthcare and what actually gets implemented in every day practice. The science of dissemination and implementation (D&I) seeks to address this gap by understanding how to best ensure that evidence-based strategies to improve health and prevent disease are effectively delivered in clinical and public health practice. continue...

NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Behavioral Economic Approaches to Enhancing Adherence
May 23, 2013

Kevin Volpp, M.D., Ph.D.
Webinar.

Behavioral economic approaches merge the fields of economics and psychology and have been used to modify behvaior across the spectrum. Dr. Volpp’s work focuses on developing and testing innovative ways of applying insights from behavioral economics in improving patient health behavior and affecting provider performance. He has done work with a variety of employers, insurers, health systems, and consumer companies in testing the effectiveness of different behavioral economic strategies in addressing tobacco dependence, obesity, and medication non-adherence. continue...

Is It All About Me? The Role of Public Health in an Era of Personalized Medicine
May 10, 2013

Sandro Galea, MD, MPH, DrPH
Neuroscience Building, 6001 Executive Blvd, Rockville MD, Room A.

Panel on Careers in Epidemiology and Behavioral Sciences
May 14, 2013

Considering a Career in Epidemiology, Psychology or Public Health? Wondering where to look for a job, or which job’s the best fit for you? Come hear firsthand from people trained in the behavioral and epidemiological sciences and now work in ACADEMIA, GOVERNMENT, or THE PRIVATE SECTOR continue...

NIH Adherence Network Webinar Series: Systematic Review of Adherence Interventions
May 16, 2013
Webinar

Are you aware of the new systematic review of interventions to enhance adherence from AHRQ? Want to know more about it? Then join Dr. Christine DeLong Jones as she discusses findings from a recent systematic review of interventions to improve medication adherence (AHRQ Contract 290-2007-10056-I; Ann Intern Med. 2012;157:785-795). continue...

New Challenges for Big Data: How Monitoring Behaviors in the Home and Environment an drive the Discovery of Important Behavioral Markers and Influence Care
January 24, 2013

ABSTRACT: There is an increasing focus on changing healthcare from being reactive and clinic- or hospital-based to being proactive and continuous, with an emphasis on interventions that make use of home monitoring and information/communications technology to facilitate scalable approaches for delivering care to the home. continue...

Mobile Health (mHealth): From smart phone apps and sensor streams to behavioral biomarkers (Webinar)
January 29, 2013

Deborah Estrin, PhD
Professor of Computer Science
Cornell NYC Tech, New York, NY

The most significant health and wellness challenges increasingly involve multiple chronic conditions, from diabetes, hypertension, and asthma to depression, chronic-pain, sleep and neurological disorders. continue...

BSSR Lecture Series - Re-entry=Where Public Health and Mass Incarceration Collide
November 15, 2012

This event will feature three presentations covering NIH-funded research projects that explore aspects of re-entry and community health’s intersection including: HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, substance abuse, mental disorders, clinical research, health services, health disparities, social environment, sexual behavior and public policy. continue...

NEA and NIH Co-host live webinar on new funding opportunity on culture and health
October 4, 2012

How does culture affect health-related beliefs and practices? Artists and arts organizations may help answer this question through a new funding opportunity from the National Institutes of Health. continue...

2012 NIH BSSR Retreat
October 22, 2012 in Bethesda, MD

Convention of NIH behavioral and social scientists aimed at further building the internal BSSR community and fostering enhanced collaboration. continue...

BSSR Lecture Series - The Science of Injury Prevention Research: Past Successes and Future Challenges
September 21, 2012 at 2-3 p.m. in Rockville, MD
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Prevention research in the injury field has matured over the last few decades and results offer optimism for reducing this toll in the future. This talk will provide an overview of the field, its history of accomplishments, as well as the challenges and opportunities that face it in the future. continue...

Workshop on Research Gaps and Opportunities for Exploring the Relationship between the Arts and Health and Well-Being in Older Adults
September 14, 2012 in Washington, DC
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The purpose of the workshop is to identify research gaps and opportunities for exploring the relationship of arts participation and creativity to physical health and psychological well-being in older adults. continue...

Integrating Economic Analysis into NIH Funded Research (Webinar Materials)
September 11, 2012 at 2-4 p.m. ET Webinar

The purpose of this webinar is to encourage collaboration between biobehavioral investigators and economists so that the results of clinical trials and studies are designed to promote appropriate and prompt implementation. continue...

2012 Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)
July 9-13, 2012 in San Jose, CA

One of the most critical issues impeding improvements in public health today is the enormous gap between what we know can optimize health and healthcare and what actually gets used and implemented in everyday practice. The science of dissemination and implementation (D&I) seeks to address this gap by understanding how to best ensure that evidence-based strategies to improve health and prevent disease are effectively delivered in clinical and public health practice.

D&I research draws from a variety of behavioral and social science disciplines and employs approaches and methods that in the past have not been taught comprehensively in most graduate degree programs.

Though this field of research has gained incredible momentum in recent years, there remains a need to grow a cadre of both new and established scientists who are prepared to (1) address the complex process of bridging research and practice in a variety of real-world settings and to (2) conduct research that balances rigor with relevance and employs study designs and methods appropriate for the complex processes involved in dissemination and implementation. continue...


2012 NIH Summer Institute on Social and Behavioral Intervention Research
July 9-13, 2012 in New York, NY

The NIH Summer Institute will address essential conceptual, methodological, and practical issues involved in planning and carrying out research on the impact of behavioral and social interventions on health outcomes, health behavior, and treatment. Such interventions are relevant to NIH public health goals of preventing morbidity and mortality and promoting health and well-being for persons with medical and behavioral disorders and conditions.

The Institute is intended for junior investigators who have COMPLETED THEIR DOCTORATEand who plan to develop NIH grant applications for research in this area. Faculty (mentors) will include established investigators from relevant social work and other fields. Participants will be expected to submit a draft NIH grant application to their respective mentors by September 1, 2012 (tentative). continue...


Advancing Prevention: Knowledge Gaps and New Partnerships
June 28 -29, 2012 at NIH Campus, 6th Floor, Building 31

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invites you to a two-day conference that will bring together Federal agencies that invest in health promotion and disease prevention research with those that implement the research to discover shared research needs and form new partnerships. continue...


2012 Institute on Systems Science and Health (ISSH)
June 10-15, 2012 at Washington University, St.Louis, MO

The 2012 Institute on Systems Science and Health (ISSH) will provide investigators with a thorough introduction to selected systems science methodologies that may be used to study behavioral and social dimensions of public health. Participants in the week-long Institute focused on one of three methodologies: agent-based modeling, system dynamics modeling, or network analysis. continue...


Using Mixed Methods to Optimize Dissemination and Implementation of Health Interventions
May 3, 2012 in Bethesda, MD

Mixed methods research is increasingly important for addressing complex problems facing public health. Mixed methods approaches are particularly well-suited to enhance our understanding of how to optimize dissemination and implementation (D&I) of evidence-based interventions. A challenge inherent in D&I research is that often neither a qualitative nor a quantitative approach alone is sufficient to fully understand the processes involved and/or outcomes resulting from the dissemination or implementation of a given intervention. Mixed methods research involves the intentional collection and integration of both qualitative and quantitative data and capitalizes on the strengths of each to enhance the breadth and depth of the researchers' understanding of a problem. Mixed methods research is a tool that can help to ensure that evidence-base strategies to improve health and prevent disease are effectively delivered in clinical and public health practice. continue...


Big man on campus: Social regulation of gene & endocrine expression in human and nonhuman primates
March 20, 2012 in Bethesda, MD

NIH's Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) presents its fourth symposium on Human and Model Animal Research in the Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences.

This series brings together scientists who conduct research on similar topics--at minimum, one researcher with human subjects, another with model animals. After individual presentations, the presenters, hosts and symposium participants will discuss areas of interest and potential future directions. continue


5th Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Research at the Crossroads
March 19-20, 2012 in Bethesda, MD

There is a recognized need to close the gap between research evidence and clinical and public health practice and policy. How is this best accomplished? Dissemination and implementation research in health seeks to answer this question, and is gaining momentum as a field of scientific inquiry. The goal of the annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation is to facilitate growth in the research base by providing a forum for communicating and networking about the science of dissemination and implementation.

Researchers, evaluators and implementers who are interested in identifying opportunities and strategies for overcoming obstacles for dissemination and implementation research/evaluation are encouraged to attend this meeting. The goal is to engage in dialog, exchange ideas, explore contemporary topics and challenge one another to identify and test research approaches that will advance dissemination and implementation science.

Registration and call for proposals details will be available online shortly at: http://conferences.thehillgroup.com/obssr/di2012/index.html


Webinar on Research to Generate Behavioral Interventions to Address Multiple Chronic Health Conditions
December 16, 2011

December 14, 2011 marks the anniversary of the HHS Strategic Framework on Multiple Chronic Conditions - an innovative private-public sector collaboration to coordinate responses to a growing challenge. Consistent with the goals of the Strategic Framework, an initiative at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was developed to generate research that targets behavioral interventions for people with multiple chronic conditions.Behavioral Interventions to Address Multiple Chronic Health Conditions in Primary Care (R01, PA-12-024) is a recently-released funding announcement that is supported by many of the NIH Institutes and Centers.

Health care providers face the ongoing challenge of supporting patients in a broad range of health decisions and behaviors that influence their daily well-being and long-term outcomes. Yet patients vary greatly in their treatment preferences and capacity for adopting healthy behaviors and managing disease. This is especially the case when the self-care and behavior change strategies required are associated with multiple chronic diseases. This is a growing issue with more than a quarter of all Americans - and two out of three older Americans - currently having multiple chronic conditions. These numbers are expected to rise as the number of older Americans increases.continue..


To join the webinar go to: http://conferences.thehillgroup.com/obssr/di2012/index.html

Audio Bridge: Dial-in  866-628-8620  /  Passcode 135462


2011 Mobile Health (mHealth) Winter Institute
Deadline: December 5-9, 2011

OBSSR and many NIH Institutes, Centers, and Federal partners will host a five-day training Institute that will bring together leaders in mobile technology, behavioral sciences and clinical research to lead a cross-training event for early career investigators with interest in mHealth. The training curriculum will cover the current state of the science in mobile technology and engineering, behavior change theory and clinical applications, and highlight the intersection among these areas for research related to health. Participants should expect to leave the Institute with experience creating mHealth projects in an interdisciplinary setting.

For more information, please visit:
http://obssr.od.nih.gov/training_and_education/mhealth_application.aspx


HIV/AIDS 2011 and Beyond: Propelling the Next Generation of Research with Behavioral and Social Science

November 9, 2011, NIH Main Campus, Building 45, Natcher Conference Center, Balcony B

OBSSR is convening a symposium commemorating 30 years since the first reported cases of HIV/AIDS in 1981. This event honors the significant contributions of behavioral and social science to HIV/AIDS research thus far and highlights ways in which it will continue to advance the understanding, treatment and prevention of the disease moving forward.

World-renowned researchers - Drs. Thomas Coates (UCLA), Wafaa El-Sadr (Columbia Univ.), David Bangsberg (Harvard Univ.) and Carl Dieffenbach (NIH/NIAID) - will offer presentations on the role of behavioral and social science in HIV/AIDS research projects targeting three research and implementation goals: expanded testing, effective prevention tools and a cure. No registration is required and the event is free and open to the general public. More information is available by contacting OBSSR's Dana Sampson (Sampsond@od.nih.gov).


Behavioral Economics, Classical Economics, Public Policy, Politics, and Health
September 23, 2011 in Rockville, MD

George Loewenstein, PhD
Department of Social and Decision Sciences
Carnegie Mellon University
September 23, 2011
Room A, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd, Rockville, MD

2011 Training Institute on Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)
August 1-5, 2011 in Chapel Hill, NC

The goal of this 5-day training institute is to provide participants with a thorough grounding in conducting dissemination and implementation research in health. Faculty and guest lecturers will consist of leading experts (practitioners and teachers) in theory, implementation and evaluation approaches to D&I, creating partnerships and multi-level transdisciplinary research teams, research design, methods and analyses appropriate for D&I investigations and conducting research at different and multiple levels of interventions (e.g., clinical, community, policy). Participants will be expected to return to their home institutions prepared to share what they have learned at the institute to help grow the field of D&I research (e.g., giving talks, leading seminars, forming new collaborations, mentoring, and submitting D&I grant proposals etc).

For more information, please visit:
http://conferences.thehillgroup.com/OBSSRinstitutes/TIDIRH2011/index.html


2011 Mobile Health (mHealth) Summer Institute
June 20-24, 2011 in San Diego, CA

OBSSR and many NIH Institutes, Centers, and Federal partners will host a five-day training Institute that will bring together leaders in mobile technology, behavioral sciences and clinical research to lead a cross-training event for early career investigators with interest in mHealth. The training curriculum will cover the current state of the science in mobile technology and engineering, behavior change theory and clinical applications, and highlight the intersection among these areas for research related to health. Participants should expect to leave the Institute with experience creating mHealth projects in an interdisciplinary setting.

For more information, please visit:
http://obssr.od.nih.gov/training_and_education/mhealth/index.aspx


The Fifth Matilda White Riley Lecture in the Behavioral and Social Sciences
June 2, 2011, 3:00pm-4:30pm, Natcher Conference Center, Balcony A, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland

Social Isolation and Health
John T. Cacioppo, Ph.D.

Social species, by definition, form organizations that extend beyond the individual. These structures evolved hand in hand with behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms to support them because the consequent social behaviors helped these organisms survive, reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced, thereby ensuring their genetic legacy. Social isolation represents a lens through which to investigate these behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms. Evidence from human and nonhuman animal studies indicates that isolation heightens sensitivity to social threats (predator evasion) and motivates the renewal of social connections. The effects of perceived isolation in humans share much in common with the effects of experimental manipulations of isolation in nonhuman social species: increased tonic sympathetic tonus and HPA activation, and decreased inflammatory control, immunity, sleep salubrity, and expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid responses. Together, these effects contribute to higher rates of morbidity and mortality in older adults.

For more information, please visit:
http://obssr.od.nih.gov/news_and_events/lectures_and_seminars/matilda_white_riley_annual_lecture/seminars.aspx


Institute on Systems Science and Health (ISSH)
May 22-27, 2011 in Pittsburgh, PA

The 2011 Institute on Systems Science and Health (ISSH) will provide investigators with a thorough introduction to selected systems science methodologies that may be used to study behavioral and social dimensions of public health. Participants in the week-long Institute will focus on one of three methodologies: agent-based modeling, system dynamics modeling, or network analysis.

For more information, please visit:
http://obssr-test.od.nih.gov/training_and_education/issh/2011/index.html


OBSSR Attracts Thousands at First USA SciFest
Saturday, October 23, 2010

NIH's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research was part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall. One of 1,500 exhibits, our exhibit, GAMES TO REWIRE THE BRAIN: Autism and Games that Teach Facial Perception Skills, was one of the most popular and drew large crowds all day from the nearly 500,000 people who attended the festival. It featured interactive video games which rewarded the user for correctly identifying faces and emotions.

For more information, please visit:
http://nihrecord.od.nih.gov/newsletters/2010/11_12_2010/story1.htm

Tenth Annual Summer Institute on Design and Conduct of Randomized Clinical Trials Involving Behavioral Interventions
July 11-23, 2010

The objective of this course is to provide a thorough grounding in the conduct of randomized clinical trials to researchers and health professionals interested in developing competence in the planning, design, and execution of randomized clinical trials involving behavioral interventions. The curriculum will enable participants to:
  • Describe the principles underlying the conduct of unbiased clinical trials.
  • Identify the unique challenges posed by behavioral randomized clinical trials (RCTs).
  • Evaluate alternative RCT designs in terms of their appropriateness to scientific and clinical goals.
  • Select appropriate strategies for enrollment, randomization, and retention of participants.
  • Understand methods for monitoring, coordinating, and conducting RCTs.
  • Develop strategies for appropriate statistical analyses of RCT data.
  • Evaluate the quality of behavioral RCTs and interpret their results.
  • Design a RCT research project in collaboration with a scientific team.
More...

The Fourth Matilda White Riley Lecture in the Behavioral and Social Sciences: Long life in the 21st Century
June 18, 2010, 3:00 – 4:30 pm

We are approaching a watershed moment in human history, when the number of people over 65 will surpass the number of children under 15. By the time our children reach old age, living to 100 will be commonplace. Life expectancy increased so quickly that culture has not had time to catch up. But rest assured, these demographic changes will change virtually all aspects of life - education, families, financial markets and politics. To the extent that people arrive at old age mentally sharp, physically fit, and financially secure, long-lived societies will thrive. But as Matilda White Riley so eloquently argued there is a structural lag between extended years and cultural supports for those added years. Dr. Carstensen argues that among the most pressing needs of the modern world is the development of "longevity science," namely, advances and discoveries that can form the basis of a culture that uses added years to improve quality of life at all ages.

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5th International Conference on HIV Treatment Adherence
May 23-25, 2010

The International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care (IAPAC), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Reseach (OBSSR), and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) will convene research investigators and health care professionals to further scientific understanding and clinical practice regarding patient adherence to HIV/AIDS treatment at the 5th International Conference on HIV Treatment Adherence (May 23-25, 2010, Miami, FL).

Adherence to medical treatment for HIV/AIDS is an essential determinant of treatment success or failure. Yet, we still have much to learn about adherence measurement, determinants, and interventions. These are complex challenges that require multidisciplinary cooperation among providers, researchers, government agencies, and patients.

The 5th International Conference on HIV Treatment Adherence will provide a forum where the state-of-the-science for HIV treatment adherence research will be presented, discussed, and translated into evidence-based approaches. The 2.5-day Conference program will allow healthcare and human service professionals to examine scientifically sound and practical strategies to enhance adherence to HIV treatment in a variety of domestic and international settings.

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2010 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction (SBP10)
March 30-31, 2010

Social computing harnesses the power of computational methods to study social behavior and social context. Behavioral modeling refers to representing behavior in the abstract and is a convenient and powerful way to conduct virtual experiments and scenario planning. Both social computing and behavioral modeling are techniques designed to achieve a better understanding of complex behaviors, patterns, and associated outcomes of interest. These approaches are inherently interdisciplinary and cross disparate disciplines and require collaborative efforts to take advantage of the state-of-the-art research in order to document lessons learned and develop novel theories, experiments, and methodologies in terms of social, physical, psychological, and governmental mechanisms. This conference offers an opportunity for behavioral and social science researchers to come together with computational and computer scientists and other related disciplines and seeks to attract researchers, practitioners, program staff from federal agencies and graduate students in disciplines such as sociology, behavioral science, psychology, cultural study, health sciences, economics, computer science, engineering, information systems, physics, and operations research. The conference program will include invited speakers from government, industry, and academia, research presentations and discussions, poster and paper sessions in addition to focused pre-conference tutorial sessions and post-conference cross-fertilization workshop.

Advances in Social Computing: Proceedings from the Third International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction, SBP 2010
Bethesda, MD, USA, March 30-31, 2010

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3rd Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Methods and Measurement
March 15-16, 2010

Researchers and evaluators who are interested in identifying opportunities and obstacles for dissemination and implementation research/evaluation are encouraged to attend this meeting. The goal is to engage in dialog, exchange ideas, explore contemporary topics and challenge one another to identify and test research designs, methods and measurement that will advance dissemination and implementation science.

Understanding and Promoting Community-Based Participatory Research at the National Institutes of Health
November 9, 2009, Philadelphia, PA

OBSSR is arranging a session on CBPR at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA) in Philadelphia. This workshop presents current research community thought on CBPR approaches with a disease-specific focus. NIH grantees will discuss their thriving community-partnered projects covering issues including environmental health, cancer, and cardiovascular disease research. Additionally, the session will feature an examination of CBPR principles and advantages and relevant active NIH funding opportunities will be identified. Presenters will include: Barbara A. Israel (Univ. of Michigan), Angela Reyes (Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation), Chanita Hughes-Halbert (Univ. of Pennsylvania), Ernestine Delmoor (National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer), along with several NIH program staff.

Further information can be obtained by contacting Dana M. Sampson at Sampsond@od.nih.gov.

Developmental Science meets Systems Science
October 18 – 20, 2009, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Opportunity to participate in an OBSSR-sponsored event at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Study of Human Development (SSHD) designed to bring systems scientists together with developmental scientists. Travel scholarships for a limited number of accepted posters in the systems science poster session track are available. For more information and to apply see http://www.sshdonline.org/SSHD%20Call%20for%20Proposals%20-%202009%20-%205-1-09.doc

Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR): When Academic/Research Institutions Meet the Real World
August 10, 2009, San Francisco, CA.

OBSSR is organizing a session on CBPR at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA) in San Francisco. The workshop will present current research community thought on CBPR approaches, discuss past and current NIH funding opportunity announcements, and research projects from successful grantees. Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of CBPR and NIH's commitment to the approach, how it resonates with NIH's priorities, and successful CBPR-based research studies. Speakers will include: Meredith Minkler (UC, Berkeley), Deborah Cohen (RAND Corporation), Michon Rickman (Los Angeles City Dept. of Recreation and Parks), along with several NIH program staff.

Further information can be obtained by contacting Dana M. Sampson at Sampsond@od.nih.gov.

2009 NIH Summer Institute on Community-Based Participatory Research Targeting the Medically Underserved
August 2-7, 2009

The NIH Summer Institute will address essential conceptual, methodological, and practical issues inherent in planning and conducting research on health promotion, disease prevention, and health disparities that is conducted in partnership between communities and researchers and targets medically underserved areas (MUAs) and medically underserved populations (MUPs) as defined by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). This research may include intervention research (i.e., quasi-experimental research projects that seek to influence preventive behaviors, treatment adherences, complementary behaviors, and related attitudes and beliefs). Natural experiments also may fall under the interventions rubric. Examples include, and are not limited to promotion of physical activity-friendly neighborhoods; tobacco, alcohol and drug abuse prevention among youth; a community-led action plan for cancer, hypertension and cardiovascular disease prevention and control in minority populations; establishing safer work practices among agricultural workers in rural areas; nutrition and reducing childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS and STD prevalence among young adults; promoting infant mental health; and reducing health disparities.

Ninth Annual Summer Institute on Design and Conduct of Randomized Clinical Trials Involving Behavioral Interventions
July 12-24, 2009

The objective of this course is to provide a thorough grounding in the conduct of randomized clinical trials to researchers and health professionals interested in developing competence in the planning, design, and execution of randomized clinical trials involving behavioral interventions. The curriculum will enable participants to:
  • Describe the principles underlying the conduct of unbiased clinical trials.
  • Identify the unique challenges posed by behavioral randomized clinical trials (RCTs).
  • Evaluate alternative RCT designs in terms of their appropriateness to scientific and clinical goals.
  • Select appropriate strategies for enrollment, randomization, and retention of participants.
  • Understand methods for monitoring, coordinating, and conducting RCTs.
  • Develop strategies for appropriate statistical analyses of RCT data.
  • Evaluate the quality of behavioral RCTs and interpret their results.
  • Design a RCT research project in collaboration with a scientific team.
More...

Gene-Environment Interplay in Stress and Health at the Association for Psychological Science 21st Annual Convention
May 22-25 , 2009

The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research is a co-sponsor of a special theme program at the Association for Psychological Science (APS) Convention on "Gene-Environment Interplay in Stress and Health". This cross-cutting theme session will feature invited addresses by Steve Cole, Cornelius Gross, Ahmad Hariri, and Julia Kim-Cohen. The format features a variety of distinguished speakers followed by a roundtable discussion and a dedicated poster session. This special program is an unparalleled opportunity to learn about cutting-edge findings and network with leading researchers in this area.

This is one of three unique theme programs at the convention. Information on the theme events and the rest of the outstanding convention program is available at https://www.psychologicalscience.org/convention/.

APS is accepting posters related to the Gene-Environment theme program through January 20, 2009. Submissions not accepted for a themed poster session will automatically be considered for one of the general poster sessions. To submit, go to www.psychologicalscience.org/cfs/author/login.cfm. See Submission Rules and Guidelines for more details.

Institute on Systems Science and Health
May 3-8, 2009, Ann Arbor, Michigan

To provide investigators with a thorough introduction to selected systems science methodologies that may be used to study behavioral and social dimensions of public health. Participants in the week-long Institute will focus on one of three methodologies: agent-based modeling, system dynamics modeling, or network analysis.

For more information please visit the ISSH page.


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