Harnessing Precision Medicine to Reduce Smoking

Harnessing Precision Medicine to Reduce Smoking

Harnessing Precision Medicine to Reduce Smoking

Monday, June 15, 2015

Laura Jean Bierut, M.D., Washington University School of Medicine

 

Monday, June 15, 2015
Laura Jean Bierut, M.D., Washington University School of Medicine

Description
Part of NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) webinar series Advances in GxE Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences.

Smoking is the largest cause of preventable mortality in the U.S. and the world, and over 40 million Americans are current cigarette smokers. Despite strong adverse consequences of smoking, cessation remains a difficult goal, and over half of current smokers report making a quit attempt in the previous year. Clear evidence now shows that heaviness of smoking is driven by genetic variation in cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunit genes and nicotine metabolizing genes. These same variants predict failed smoking cessation and are the strongest genetic risk factors for lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Importantly, there is evidence of a complex interplay between environments, pharmacologic treatment, and genes in the prediction successful smoking cessation. This body of work illustrates an example in achieving our goal of precision medicine: using genetic information to differentiate people who are likely to respond to pharmacologic treatment for smoking cessation from those who will likely receive little benefit.

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