OBSSR Connector Monthly Newsletter

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) Connector Monthly Newsletter is a monthly e-newsletter featuring updates from OBSSR Director William T. Riley, Ph.D., information about behavioral and social sciences in the news, events and announcements, findings from recently published research, funding announcements, and other updates. The current newsletter is provided below.

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national institutes of health - office of behaviorial and social sciences research
OBSSR Connector Monthly

August 14, 2018

Director's Voice

NIH Releases Notice Delaying Enforcement of Clinical Trials Policies for Basic Research. On July 20, 2018, the NIH released Guide Notice NOT-OD-18-212, “Delayed Enforcement and Short-Term Flexibilities for Some Requirements Affecting Prospective Basic Science Studies Involving Human Participants.” For “prospective basic science studies involving human participants” that the NIH considered as meeting its revised definition of a clinical trial for the purposes of its clinical trials policies, this notice provides the following flexibilities until September 24, 2019, during which time the NIH will assess its approach to registration and reporting for these studies and seek feedback from the research community on its registration and reporting requirement for these studies.

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Research Spotlights

Research Spotlights

Findings from Recently Published Research

 

mhealth

mHealth intervention increases HIV medication adherence and reduces HIV transmission risk

Behavioral interventions increase adherence to combination antiretroviral therapies (cART) and reduce HIV viral load but require resource-intensive in-person sessions. In a recently published study funded by NIDA and NIAID, researchers adapted this intervention to an mHealth platform to provide more flexibility and reach.
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child sleeping

Quality sleep during childhood predicts resilience in young adults

Children of alcoholics (COAs) are more likely to develop alcohol use disorder and have behavioral problems, but in those who do not, what contributes to resilience? This was the focus of a recently funded NIAAA study that considered how quality sleep in COAs is related to behavioral control in adolescents and resilience in emerging adulthood.
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warning label

Aversive reactions to photo warnings on cigarette packs increase quit attempts

Pictorial warnings on cigarette packs lead to more quit attempts by smokers than text-only warnings, but the reasons for this difference are unclear.  In a recent study funded by NCI and NIEHS, researchers sought to identify psychological mechanisms that explain the increased quit attempts seen with pictorial warnings.
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In the Know

Events and Announcements

August Director's Webinar featuring Russell Poldrack, Ph.D.

On Monday, August 20, at 1:00 p.m. ET, Russell A. Poldrack, Ph.D., Albert Ray Lang Professor of Psychology, Stanford University, will present: Toward data-driven ontologies for mental function. Psychological science has long been focused on the discovery of novel behavioral phenomena and the mechanistic explanation of those phenomena, which has led to a lack of cumulative conceptual progress. Dr. Poldrack will argue that the development of ontologies is essential for progress, but that these need to be tied directly to empirical data. He will provide an example from the domain of self-regulation, where we have used data-driven ontology development to describe the psychological structure of this domain and characterize its predictive validity with respect to real-world outcomes.
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Chronic Pain: The Science of Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches

OBSSR in collaboration with NCCIH and the NIH Pain Consortium is co-sponsoring a 1-day symposium at the 17th World Congress on Pain in Boston, Massachusetts. This International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Satellite Symposium will be held on Tuesday, September 11, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Boston Convention Center. The objectives of the symposium are to:

  • Present the past, present, and future of natural products research and pain management, focusing on our current understanding of the ascending and descending neural mechanisms by which different natural products may contribute to analgesia
  • Ascertain the mechanisms by which a variety of mind and body approaches may modulate pain
  • Discuss translational potential for complementary and integrative approaches for individual-based chronic pain management

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HINTS Data Users Conference

Register now to attend the fifth HINTS Data Users Conference, to be held September 13-14, from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Natcher Conference Center (NIH main campus). The conference is an opportunity to learn more about research being conducted using NCI’s Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) data, as well as the role of HINTS research in public health and clinical care. Register by September 12, 2018 to reserve your spot at the conference. Registration is free, but space is limited.
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Webinar on packaging color research by tobacco companies: the pack as a product characteristic

Join OBSSR Director William T. Riley, Ph.D., and Stanton A. Glantz, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco, on Tuesday, September 18, at 2:00 p.m. ET for a director's webinar on “Packaging color research by tobacco companies: the pack as a product characteristic.” Tobacco companies use color on cigarette packaging and labelling to communicate brand imagery, diminish health concerns, and as a replacement for prohibited descriptive words ('light' and 'mild') to make misleading claims about reduced risks. Dr. Glantz analyzed previously secret tobacco industry documents to identify additional ways in which cigarette companies tested and manipulated pack colors to affect consumers' perceptions of the cigarettes' flavor and strength.
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Advances in Child Development and Behavior Speaker Series

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development invites you to two upcoming Advances in Child Development and Behavior Speaker Series presentations:

On Tuesday, August 21, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. (6710B Rockledge Drive, room 2431), Dr. Marion K. Underwood, Dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences at Purdue University, will give a presentation titled “Social Aggression, Social Media, and the Perils of Lurking Online.”

Dr. Tonya Palermo, Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine and Director of the Pediatric Pain & Sleep Innovations Lab at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, will give a presentation titled “Innovations in Behavioral and Psychological Treatment of Pediatric Chronic Pain,” on Tuesday, September 25, from noon to 1:00 p.m. (6710B Rockledge Drive, room 1417).
Registration Not Required

NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Coordinating Committee Meeting

Please join the next NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Coordinating Committee (BSSR CC) open meeting on Friday, October 5, 2018, from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on NIH’s campus (Rockledge II, room 9112/9116) or online (WebEx access code: 628 548 199, password: gWZPDbr4). Representatives from NIH Institutes and Centers will meet to discuss behavioral and social sciences-relevant topics.
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Webinar Recording: Targeting Cognitive and Affective Processes in Behavioral Development Research

The June Director’s Webinar recording, featuring guest speakers Greg Siegle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Translational Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and Arielle Baskin-Sommers, Ph.D., Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Assistant Professor at Yale University, is now available. Dr. Siegle discussed cognitive training to address obstacles to recovery, and Dr. Baskin-Sommers presented on an experimental therapeutics approach to target antisocial behaviors.
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11th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health (D&I)

Registration is open for the 11th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health (D&I), to be held December 3-5, 2018 at the Renaissance Washington, DC. This conference, co-hosted by the NIH and AcademyHealth, helps realize the full potential of evidence to optimize health and health care by bridging the gap between research, practice, and policy. By outlining the priorities in the field, the Science of D&I Conference aims to ensure that evidence is used to inform decisions that will improve the health of individuals and communities.
Register Today

NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory Program

The overall goal of the NIH Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program is to strengthen the national capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale research studies that engage health care delivery organizations as research partners. Research conducted in partnership with health care systems is essential to make research results more relevant to medical practice. This type of research takes place at the site of care under the real-world conditions of medical practice. The program currently supports a series of clinical trial Demonstration Projects that take place at the site of care with health care delivery systems participating as full research partners.
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New Ventures to Study Infants and Young Children through National Survey

The relationship of early child nutrition to health throughout the lifespan is an important and growing area of public health interest. The stage from birth to 24 months (B-24 mo) is particularly important nutritionally because of increased demands to support growth and development and opportunities to positively influence the trajectory for building healthy dietary patterns. Traditionally, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans has focused on ages 2 years and older. The Agricultural Act of 2014 (aka, Farm Bill) mandated that beginning with the 2020-2025 edition, the Dietary Guidelines will include recommendations for pregnancy and children B-24 months. Nationally representative nutrition data are an important source of evidence for the Dietary Guidelines and Federal nutrition monitoring activities. However, current national data for children B-24 months are not sufficient.
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Funding Announcements

Short-term Mentored Career Enhancement Awards in Mobile and Wireless Health Technology and Data Analytics: Cross-Training at the intersection of Behavioral and Social Sciences and STEM Disciplines

The goal of the program is to support the development of research capability in mobile and wireless health technology (e.g., wearable devices, mobile applications, electronic health records, data analytics). Special emphasis will be given to independent behavioral and social sciences investigators who seek to train in a STEM discipline (e.g., big data analysis, computational modeling, engineering, computer science, and mathematics) or to STEM scientists who which to train in a behavioral and social science discipline.
(K18 Independent Clinical Trial Required)
(K18 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Request for Information (RFI): Registration and Results Reporting Standards for Prospective Basic Science Studies Involving Human Participants

This RFI seeks additional input from stakeholders throughout the scientific research community and the general public regarding how best to implement the NIH Policy on the Dissemination of NIH-Funded Clinical Trial Information (NOT-OD-16-149) for prospective basic science studies involving human participants. NIH is specifically interested in learning more about studies that meet the NIH definition of a clinical trial (NOT-OD-15-015) but are not defined as applicable clinical trials (42 CFR Part 11), and also meet the definition of fundamental research.
View RFI

Analyses of Adherence Strategies and Data Sets from CALERIE to Explore Behavioral and Psychosocial Aspects of Sustained Caloric Restriction in Humans (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) invites applications for research projects (R01) involving secondary analyses of data in the Computerized Tracking System (CTS) database from the CALERIE (Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy) trial to explore behavioral and psychosocial aspects of sustained caloric restriction (CR) in humans, including the translation of the CR adherence strategies used in the trial to promote healthy behaviors, especially for the prevention of weight gain with age. CALERIE was the first trial in humans to specifically focus on the effects of sustained CR. It demonstrated feasibility of sustained human CR (for at least two years) and favorable effects on predictors of longevity, as well as on cardiometabolic risk factors. The sustained weight loss in CALERIE has not been previously attained in any clinical study in non-obese individuals.
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Exploratory Analyses of Adherence Strategies and Data Sets from CALERIE to Investigate Behavioral and Psychosocial Aspects of Sustained Caloric Restriction in Humans (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) invites applications for new exploratory research projects (R21) involving secondary analyses of data in the Computerized Tracking System (CTS) database from the CALERIE (Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy) trial to explore behavioral and psychosocial aspects of sustained caloric restriction (CR) in humans, including the translation of the CR adherence strategies used in the trial to promote healthy behaviors, especially for the prevention of weight gain with age. CALERIE was the first trial in humans to specifically focus on the effects of sustained CR. It demonstrated feasibility of sustained human CR (for at least two years) and favorable effects on predictors of longevity, as well as on cardiometabolic risk factors. The sustained weight loss in CALERIE has not been previously attained in any clinical study in non-obese individuals.
View FOA

Social and Behavioral Research eLearning Course

Good Clinical Practice in Social and Behavioral Research

Complete the free NIH Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Training through the Society of Behavioral Medicine. In September 2016, the NIH issued a Policy on Good Clinical Practice Training for NIH awardees involved in NIH-funded clinical trials. The principles of GCP help assure the safety, integrity, and quality of clinical trials. Certificates will be given upon completion of the training.
Take The Training

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