OBSSR Connector Monthly Newsletter

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) Connector Monthly Newsletter is a monthly e-newsletter featuring updates from OBSSR Director William T. Riley, Ph.D., information about behavioral and social sciences in the news, events and announcements, findings from recently published research, funding announcements, and other updates. The current newsletter is provided below.
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OBSSR Connector Monthly

April 9, 2019

Director's Voice

The Protocol Template for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Involving Humans: A New Community Resource!

This blog was co-authored by Dr. Bill Riley and Dr. Carrie D. Wolinetz, Director of the NIH Office of Science Policy (OSP). More information about OSP can be found here.

A few months ago, back in August 2018, we authored a blog letting the community know that we were working on a new resource for behavioral and social science researchers to prepare research protocols for human studies measuring a behavioral or social outcome or testing a behavioral or social science-based intervention. We are now happy to report back that the template has been finalized and is ready for researchers to utilize. Even better news is that the template has been fully integrated into the NIH’s Clinical e-Protocol Writing Tool!

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Research Spotlights

Findings from Recently Published Research

 

Photo of older woman sitting on chair looking out the window, associated with April 2019 research spotlight article on social isolation - associations with physical activity and sedentary behavior.

Social isolation – associations with physical activity and sedentary behavior

How interconnected we are to our communities can have profound impacts on health and longevity and is an increasing concern for aging populations. Recently, a study funded by NIA, OBSSR, and the British Heart Foundation investigated if being lonely and/or isolated are associated with being less physically active in older adults. To-date, there has been little research looking at these issues in aging populations and most of this research uses self-report measures instead of objective measures.
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Photo of neighborhood of houses, associated with April 2019 research spotlight article on predicting the health risks of adverse childhood experiences; it's complicated.

Predicting the health risks of adverse childhood experiences; it’s complicated

Researchers sought to untangle the complex associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and increased risk for poorer socioeconomic, health, and emotional-wellbeing outcomes in a recent study supported by NIA, NCATS, OBSSR, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Georgetown University, and UCLA. This study used two independent samples of twins and siblings from the United States.
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Photo of pack of cigarettes with one sticking out, associated with April 2019 research spotlight article called 'Can genetics determine your cigarette preference? African Americans and menthol cigarette use.

Can genetics determine your cigarette preference? African Americans and menthol cigarette use

Recent research supported by NIDCR, NCATS, NIMH, NINDS, NIDA, NIH OD, and the FDA sought to determine if there is a genetic basis for the preference to smoke menthol cigarettes. Cigarette smoking remains a leading cause of preventable disease and mortality in the US. Overall rates of smoking have declined dramatically over the last 50 years; however, the use of mentholated cigarettes has not declined and has increased in some groups.
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In the Know

Events and Announcements

 

Registration Open: 12th NIH Matilda White Riley Honors

Register for the 12th NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors, to be held on Thursday, June 6, from 8:00 am to 12 noon on NIH's Main Campus - Wilson Hall, Building 1. The 2019 Distinguished Lecturer is Mark J. VanLandingham, Ph.D. Thomas C. Keller Professor Director, Center for Studies of Displaced Populations at Tulane University. Dr. Keller will present “Culture and Resilience: Insights from the Vietnamese American community in post-Katrina New Orleans.”
Register Today

 

[OBSSR Director's Webinar] The Eureka Research Platform: A Resource for Mobilizing Research

Join OBSSR and Jeffrey Olgin, M.D., Gallo-Chatterjee Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Division of Cardiology Chief at the University of California at San Francisco on Tuesday, May 14 at 2:00 p.m. ET for an overview of the Eureka Research Platform, an NIH-funded resource for conducting research using mobile technology. Dr. Olgin will describe the resource (including its capabilities), provide a description of ongoing studies using the platform, and share lessons learned and the mechanisms by which the resource can be used for NIH-funded studies.
Register Today

 

[SOBC Webinar] Translating Behavior Change into the Community: Diabetes Prevention & Management

On Monday, April 22, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. ET, the Science of Behavior Change will host the April Grand Rounds Speaker, Jeffrey Katula, Ph.D. Dr. Katula’s work involves the prevention and management of chronic disease, particularly Type II diabetes and cognitive functioning. He has been involved in numerous single site RCTs, such as the Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD; NIDDK) and Lifestyle Interventions for the Treatment of Diabetes (LIFT-D; NIMHD).
Join Webinar

 

NIH Blueprint Workshop: The Science of Interception and Its Roles in Nervous System Disorders

Join the NIH Blueprint April 16-17, 2019 at Lister Hill Auditorium (Bldg. 38A). The objectives of this workshop are to identify gaps in research related to the science of interoception and its role(s) in nervous system disorders, and to develop strategies and recommendations to facilitate the advancement of this area of research. This workshop will bring together expertise from diverse fields including basic neuroscience, psychology, physiology, and clinical research to deliberate two important dynamic connections – the connections between the brain and body and the connections between basic research and human/clinical research. The primary focus areas for the workshop include: the neural circuitry underlying the dynamic interactions between the central and peripheral nervous systems; interoceptive processes in associated diseases and disorders; effect of modulating interoceptive processes for potential interventions/therapies; and development of technologies and methodologies to enhance interoceptive research.
Register and View the Agenda

 

NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Festival

SAVE THE DATE: Friday, December 6, 2019 — NIH Campus, Natcher Conference Center (Bldg. 45). The Annual NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Festival will be hosted by OBSSR and the NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Coordinating Committee. The purpose of the festival is to highlight recently funded behavioral and social sciences research that the NIH supports; bring together behavioral and social scientists within the NIH extramural and intramural communities to network with each other and share scientific ideas; and explore ways to advance behavioral and social sciences research.
Learn More

 

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Funding Announcements

OBSSR-Led Funding Opportunity Announcements

RFA-OD-19-011: Predoctoral Training in Advanced Data Analytics for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (BSSR) - Institutional Research Training Program [T32]

PA-18-406: Population Health Interventions: Integrating Individual and Group Level Evidence (R21) –Clinical Trial Not Allowed

PA-18-407: Population Health Interventions: Integrating Individual and Group Level Evidence (R21) - Clinical Trial Optional

PAR-18-378: Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-18-352: Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PA-18-723: Improving Patient Adherence to Treatment and Prevention Regimens to Promote Health (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PA-18-722: Improving Patient Adherence to Treatment and Prevention Regimens to Promote Health (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

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Social and Behavioral Research eLearning Course

Good Clinical Practice in Social and Behavioral Research

Complete the free NIH Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Training through the Society of Behavioral Medicine. In September 2016, the NIH issued a Policy on Good Clinical Practice Training for NIH awardees involved in NIH-funded clinical trials. The principles of GCP help assure the safety, integrity, and quality of clinical trials. Certificates will be given upon completion of the training. Take The Training

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