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OBSSR Connector Monthly Newsletter

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) Connector Monthly Newsletter is a monthly e-newsletter featuring updates from OBSSR Director William T. Riley, Ph.D., information about behavioral and social sciences in the news, events and announcements, findings from recently published research, funding announcements, and other updates. The current newsletter is provided below.
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June 16, 2020

Director's Voice

Raynard KingtonAs we celebrate 25 years of OBSSR, we have asked the former Directors to reflect on their time at OBSSR. This guest blog was authored by OBSSR’s second Director, Raynard Kington, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A.

Promoting Inclusion of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Across the NIH: OBSSR 2000-2003.

I would like to thank the current OBSSR Director, Bill Riley, and staff for providing this opportunity to reflect on the accomplishments when I directed OBSSR from 2000-2003. Prior to serving in this role I was the Director of the Division of Health Examination Statistics at the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics where I led the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. Upon becoming the OBSSR Director, my primary goal was to promote and facilitate the inclusion of behavioral and social science research (BSSR) across the NIH.

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Research Spotlights

Findings from Recently Published Research

More diversity in your daily experiences may increase happiness and well-being

More diversity in your daily experiences may increase happiness and well-being

Experiential diversity has been shown to promote well-being in animal models, but little is known if this also be true for humans. In a recent publication, researchers funded by the NCI, NIA, National Science Foundation, and other funders, investigated the relationship between the diversity of personal daily experiences, well-being, and neural pathways in the brain. Previous research has associated the hippocampus and striatum with processing neural signals of place, novelty, and reward.
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False memories may be the result of the brain updating poorly formed memories with incorrect information

False memories may be the result of the brain updating poorly formed memories with incorrect information

Trauma and memory go hand-in-hand toward understanding the potential impact of a traumatic event. Researchers investigated this poorly understood relationship in a recent publication supported by the NIMH and other funders, using a well-established mouse model of fear. They conducted a variety of experiments to better understand the neural processes that are involved in learning about the post-trauma response.
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Personal accounts of childhood abuse are more correlated with psychopathology than with official records

Personal accounts of childhood abuse are more correlated with psychopathology than with official records

Childhood abuse and neglect has wide ranging impacts, including the health and happiness of future generations. Recent research supported by the NIMH, NICHD, NIDA, NIAAA, NIA, National Institute of Justice, and other funders assessed if objective measures of childhood abuse and neglect, defined by court records, is a better predictor of adult mental health relative to subjective measures (self-reported childhood abuse). This study defined childhood abuse as physical abuse, sexual abuse or neglect.
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In the Know

Events and Announcements

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Funding Announcements

Recently Published FOAs

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Protocol Template for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

Resource for communicating the science, methods, and operations of a clinical trial

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