OBSSR Past Events

The OBSSR hosts virtual and in-person meetings that highlight behavioral and social sciences research (BSSR). In coordination with the NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices, other government agencies, and the wider BSSR community, OBSSR facilitates opportunities to network, collaborate, explore, and advance BSSR.

OBSSR hosts a Director’s Webinar Series on a variety of BSSR topics to help communicate BSSR findings and other relevant BSSR information. OBSSR’s annual in-person meetings include the NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors and the NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Festival. Subscribe to receive updates on the latest OBSSR and BSSR-related event information.

View the list of upcoming OBSSR events.


Past Events by Year

2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 and older
July 20, 2021, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Elizabeth A. Howell, MD, MPP
Dr. Howell described the intertwined racial and ethnic disparities in maternal and infant mortality. She introduced a framework that describes the complex web of factors that contribute to these disparities. The model also described pathways linking hospital organization and quality to maternal and infant health disparities. Dr. Howell also shared her team's research findings on quality of care, disparities in severe maternal morbidity and very preterm morbidity and mortality in New York City hospitals. The presentation discussed levers to reduce disparities.
May 5, 2021, 1:00 pm | Virtual

Distinguished Lecturer: Anne Case, Ph.D.
Presentation: Death by degree: U.S. mortality in the 21st century

The 14th NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors was held virtually on Wednesday, May 5, 2021, from 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm ET. Anne Case, Ph.D., Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs Emeritus at Princeton University, is the 2021 NIH Matilda White Riley Distinguished Lecturer. Dr. Case is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research; a fellow of the Econometric Society; and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. Dr. Case’s presentation “Death by degree: U.S. mortality in the 21st century” explored the proximate and underlying causes of poorer health and shorter lives of individuals who have not been to college, and will suggest steps that could be taken to address these disparities.

March 23, 2021, 10:00 am | Virtual
Presenter: Rebecca Cunningham, M.D.

This presentation provided an overview of violence prevention among Emergency Department patients including the CDC best practice program SafERteens. Participants will understand the longitudinal outcomes of Emergency Department youth regarding substance use and violence including how to utilize the SAFETY score to predict risk for firearm injury. Review the history of firearm injury prevention research and the capacity building NICHD funded FACTS grant.

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December 2, 2020, 8:00 am | Virtual

The festival highlights exciting research results, emerging areas, and innovations in health-related BSSR. This trans-NIH event enables efficient leveraging of NIH resources and expertise. The BSSR-CC members contribute diverse and comprehensive perspectives on the NIH BSSR portfolio, thus facilitating the selection of an outstanding array of research results that are highlighted at the festival.

View Day 2 Recording
December 1, 2020, 8:00 am | Virtual

The festival highlights exciting research results, emerging areas, and innovations in health-related BSSR. This trans-NIH event enables efficient leveraging of NIH resources and expertise. The BSSR-CC members contribute diverse and comprehensive perspectives on the NIH BSSR portfolio, thus facilitating the selection of an outstanding array of research results that are highlighted at the festival.

View Day 1 Recording
June 8, 2020, 9:00 am | Virtual

Distinguished Lecturer: Toni C. Antonucci, Ph.D.
Presentation: Social relations and structural lag: A brave new age

The 13th NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors was held on Monday, June 8, 2020, from 9:00 am to noon ET, via WebEx. Toni Antonucci, Ph.D., psychology professor and program director at the University of Michigan, is the 2020 distinguished lecturer and will present: Social Relations and Structural Lag: A Brave New Age. Dr. Antonucci’s research has improved our understanding of how social relations and networks impact health across the lifespan and particularly how social relations influence one’s ability to manage life’s challenges – a particularly timely research area given the pandemic challenges in the context of constrained social relations.

May 19, 2020, 10:00 am | Virtual
Presenter: John Besley, Ph.D.

In recent years, Dr. John Besley has shifted his research from the study of public opinion about science to trying to understand scientists' opinion about the public.

As part of this work, he and his collaborators have advanced a framework for strategic science communication that emphasizes setting clear behavioral goals and then working backwards to identify communication objectives that have the potential of affecting desired behaviors, as well as tactics to help achieve the communication objectives. This perspective puts identifying and prioritizing specific communication objectives at the core of being an effective communicator. For this presentation Dr. Besley shared his thinking along with selected data from his surveys and interviews of scientists.

December 6, 2019, 9:00 am | NIH Campus - Natcher Conference Center (Building 45)

The festival highlights exciting research results, emerging areas, and innovations in health related BSSR. This trans-NIH event enables efficient leveraging of NIH resources and expertise. The BSSR-CC members contribute diverse and comprehensive perspectives on the NIH BSSR portfolio, thus facilitating the selection of an outstanding array of research results that are highlighted at the festival.

View Recording
October 4, 2019, 9:00 am | NIH Main Campus Building 50
The Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Coordinating Committee (BSSR-CC) open meetings include representatives from NIH Institutes, Centers and Offices and interested members of the public to meet to discuss behavioral and social sciences-relevant topics.
September 24, 2019, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Felicia Hill-Briggs, Ph.D., ABPP

In the era of transformation to value-based care, new accountability is placed on health care delivery systems to provide high quality care that improves the health of populations, improves the patient experience of care, and concurrently reduce costs. Many priority conditions for value-based care have associated lifestyle, behavioral, and/or mental health components that contribute to disease outcomes and costs. To address these factors, there is a growing demand for BSSR interventions that are reliable, effective in achieving desired prevention and management outcomes, acceptable to patients, and flexible for integration directly into health care and population health practice. Despite the volume of effective interventions resulting from BSSR funding, adoption of these interventions into care delivery remains rare.

Facilitators of BSSR intervention integration into practice are emerging. To illustrate, diabetes is presented as a priority disease example for value-based care. Diabetes, which affects over 30 million Americans and costs $327 billion annually in direct medical costs and reduced productivity, is a disease with concomitant lifestyle, behavioral, and mental health factors. Three diabetes related BSSR interventions are used to demonstrate pathways to BSSR integration into health care and population health practice: the Collaborative Care Model; the National Diabetes Prevention Program; and DECIDE, a diabetes self-management program. Features of pathways to integration are discussed. Implications for the design and outcomes reporting of BSSR interventions to facilitate readiness for integration into practice in the current era are identified.

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June 6, 2019, 8:00 am | NIH Campus, Wilson Hall (Bldg. 1)

Distinguished Lecturer: Mark J. VanLandingham, Ph.D.
Presentation: Culture and Resilience: Insights from the Vietnamese American community in post-Katrina New Orleans

The 12th NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors was held on Thursday, June 6, 2019 on the NIH Campus, Wilson Hall (Bldg. 1). Mark J. VanLandingham, Ph.D., Thomas C. Keller Professor, Tulane University, is the 2019 NIH Matilda White Riley Distinguished Lecturer. His research focuses on a wide array of topics related to demography, sociology, and public health. He has led recent major projects focusing on the antecedents and consequences of largescale rural-to-urban migration within Southeast Asia; and acculturation, health, and well-being among Vietnamese immigrants in the United States.

May 14, 2019, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Jeffrey Olgin, M.D.
This presentation provided an overview of the Eureka Research Platform, an NIH-funded resource for conducting research using mobile technology. Dr. Olgin described the resource (including its capabilities), provide a description of ongoing studies using the platform, and share lessons learned and the mechanisms by which the resource can be used for NIH-funded studies.
March 18, 2019, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Pamela Herd, Ph.D.
The microbiome is now considered our "second genome," with potentially comparable importance to the genome in determining human health. There is, however, a relatively limited understanding of the broader environmental factors, particularly social conditions, that shape variation in human microbial communities. Fulfilling the promise of microbiome research—particularly the microbiome’s potential for modification—will require collaboration between biologists and social and population scientists. For life scientists, the plasticity and adaptiveness of the microbiome calls for an agenda to understand the sensitivity of the microbiome to broader social environments already known to be powerful predictors of morbidity and mortality. For social and population scientists, attention to the microbiome may help elucidate nagging questions as to the underlying biological mechanisms that link social conditions to health. Dr. Herd outlined key substantive and methodological advances that can be made if collaborations between social and population health scientists and life scientists are strategically pursued, as well as provide a recent example of just such a collaboration.
November 27, 2018, 8:00 am | NIH Campus, Natcher Conference Center (Bldg. 45)

The festival highlights exciting research results, emerging areas, and innovations in health related BSSR. This trans-NIH event enables efficient leveraging of NIH resources and expertise. The BSSR-CC members contribute diverse and comprehensive perspectives on the NIH BSSR portfolio, thus facilitating the selection of an outstanding array of research results that are highlighted at the festival.

View Recording
November 13, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Peter Pirolli, Ph.D.

Peter Pirolli, Ph.D., presented an overview of the Fittle+ mHealth systems that have been used to study several evidence-based behavior change interventions. Dr. Pirolli presented models developed in the ACT-R computational cognitive architecture that address individual-level daily achievement of behavioral goals for exercise and eating, and provide a deeper account of the dynamics of self-efficacy, motivation, implementation intentions, and habit formation.

September 18, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Stanton A. Glantz, Ph.D.

Tobacco companies use color on cigarette packaging and labelling to communicate brand imagery, diminish health concerns, and as a replacement for prohibited descriptive words ('light' and 'mild') to make misleading claims about reduced risks. Dr. Glantz analyzed previously secret tobacco industry documents to identify additional ways in which cigarette companies tested and manipulated pack colors to affect consumers' perceptions of the cigarettes' flavor and strength.

August 20, 2018, 1:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Russell A. Poldrack, Ph.D.

Psychological science has long been focused on the discovery of novel behavioral phenomena and the mechanistic explanation of those phenomena, which has led to a lack of cumulative conceptual progress. Dr. Poldrack argued that the development of ontologies is essential for progress, but that these need to be tied directly to empirical data. He provided an example from the domain of self-regulation, where we have used data-driven ontology development to describe the psychological structure of this domain and characterize its predictive validity with respect to real-world outcomes.

July 17, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Michael Paasche-Orlow M.D., M.A., M.P.H.

Dr. Paasche-Orlow’s team designed and evaluated a series of interactive Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) systems. In this session, he described attributes and design features of ECA systems with a focus on the current system as deployed with six content modules (symptoms, exercise, meditation, spiritual needs, advance care planning, and storytelling). He also discussed early experiences with system utilization and the nurse alert workstation.

June 19, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Greg Siegle, Ph.D., and Arielle Baskin-Sommers, Ph.D.

Greg Siegle, Ph.D., presented on cognitive training to address obstacles to recovery. His talk described neural vulnerabilities that could help to explain the mediocre success rate of traditional behavioral treatments along with initial data suggesting that we can address these features using targeted cognitive training as pre-treatments. These data lead to an augmented conceptualization of precision medicine in which assessment can be used in traditional ways, to direct patients to different treatments or to suggest pre-treatments to turn likely-nonresponders into likely responders to conventional treatments.

Arielle Baskin-Sommers, Ph.D., presented on an experimental therapeutics approach to target antisocial behaviors. Antisocial behavior, from substance abuse to crime, produces suffering for the perpetrator, for their family members, for their community, and for society at large.

May 31, 2018, 8:00 am | NIH Campus, Wilson Hall (Bldg. 1)

Distinguished Lecturer: Terrie E. Moffitt, Ph.D.
Presentation: A Good Childhood is a Smart Investment

The 11th NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors was held on Thursday, May 18, 2018, on the NIH Campus, Wilson Hall (Bldg. 1). Terrie Moffitt, Ph.D., studies how genetic and environmental risks work together to shape the course of abnormal human behaviors and psychiatric disorders. Her particular interest is in antisocial and criminal behavior, but she also studies depression, psychosis, and addiction. She is a licensed clinical psychologist, who completed her clinical hospital training at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute (1984). Dr. Moffitt is associate director of the Dunedin Longitudinal Study, which follows 1000 people born in 1972 in New Zealand. As of 2017, she has studied the cohort from birth to age 45 so far. She also co-directs the Environmental-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, which follows 1100 British families with twins born in 1994-1995. She has studied the twins from birth to age 18 so far.

May 15, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT
Linda K. Larkey, Ph.D., CRTT, professor in Arizona State University’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and adjunct faculty with Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, reviewed the broader evidence (from her own work and others’) on Meditative Movement (MM) effects on cancer survivorship, supporting the goals of her research underway in breast cancer survivors. Extended models proposing various biomolecular and neurophysiological markers as mechanisms of effects on physical and emotional symptoms, cognitive function and body composition outcomes were also discussed.
March 27, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Kenzie A. Cameron, Ph.D., MPH, FACH

Invasive pneumococcal disease remains a leading cause of vaccine-preventable illness in the United States. Although rates of pneumococcal vaccination among non-institutionalized adults age 65 and older have increased substantially in the past 20 years, rates remain well below the target rate of 90% vaccination. In addition, racial disparities in vaccination rates persist. Current vaccination rates among adults age 65 and older are 68%; with rates of 73.1% for non-Hispanic white persons, 55.7% for non-Hispanic black persons, and 44.7% among Hispanic persons. These disparities do not appear to be due to access issues; rather, physician and patient attitudes have been implicated as root causes.

This presentation provided an overview of our process and outcomes which included: (1) conducting individual interviews to better understand specific reasons for refusal of pneumococcal vaccination among Black patients age 65 and older; (2) developing a theoretically-based patient education video on pneumonia and pneumococcal vaccination; (3) implementing a clinical decision support tool within the EHR to prompt nurses to show the video to patients newly eligible for the vaccination (i.e., 65 or 66 years old with no documentation of receipt or refusal of pneumococcal vaccination within the EHR); and (4) using the patient portal within our EHR to deliver the video to patients scheduled for a clinic visit via a message sent prior to their clinic visit.

February 27, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Warren K. Bickel, Ph.D., and Samuel McClure, Ph.D.
The speakers described a translational research program that explores the application of basic behavioral findings on delay discounting, decision science, and the neural underpinnings of these processes to the development of interventions for alcohol & drug abuse, obesity and other behavioral risk factors.
January 16, 2018, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Nancy Schmeider Redeker, Ph.D., RN, FAHA, FAAN, and Lois S. Sadler, Ph.D., RN, FAAN
Healthy sleep habits and resulting sleep quality and quantity are critical to children’s growth and development. Children who live in economically stressed urban environments are especially vulnerable to unhealthy sleep habits and their negative consequences, but families’ perceptions about sleep and sleep habits and preferences regarding support for promoting healthy sleep habits are not known and interventions are urgently needed to promote healthy sleep habits and address individual, family, cultural and social factors that contribute to poor sleep habits and sleep difficulty among young children who live in economically stressed urban environments.
December 8, 2017, 8:30 am | Natcher Conference Center (Bldg. 45)

The festival highlights exciting research results, emerging areas, and innovations in health related BSSR. This trans-NIH event enables efficient leveraging of NIH resources and expertise. The BSSR-CC members contribute diverse and comprehensive perspectives on the NIH BSSR portfolio, thus facilitating the selection of an outstanding array of research results that are highlighted at the festival.

View Recording
November 28, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Tamara Somers, Ph.D.

Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms for patients with cancer. There is evidence that behavioral pain interventions are efficacious for decreasing pain and pain-related symptoms. The NIH recommends the integration of behavioral pain interventions into cancer care. This presentation focused on strategies for increasing behavioral pain intervention access and optimization. First, funded research in intervention development and testing of novel delivery modalities (e.g., videoconferencing, smart phone) for behavioral pain interventions will be presented. Second, ongoing work co-funded by NCI and OBSSR examining the use of a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) designed to optimize the delivery of a behavioral pain intervention will be presented. This SMART is designed to provide comparative evidence of intervention-dose sequences of a behavior pain management intervention (Pain Coping Skills Training) for patients with breast cancer that adjusts based on patient response. Participants of this presentation will gain information on behavioral interventions access and optimization challenges, strategies for using mobile health technologies to increase behavioral pain intervention access, and the use of a SMART to optimize behavioral interventions.

September 26, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Eric Turkheimer, Ph.D.
It has been known for some time that children raised in impoverished environments do not express genetic differences in cognitive ability to the same extent as children raised in middle class homes, a phenomenon known as the Scarr-Rowe interaction. During this webinar, Dr. Turkheimer summarized what is known about this phenomenon, focusing on new analyses of some classic twin datasets that have not previously been available. The goal of the new analyses is to emphasize the developmental processes that underlie modification of heritability and other quantitative genetic parameters. We hypothesize that selection of more talented children into enhanced environment produces cycles of gene environment correlation, in turn accelerating differentiation of siblings. These normal developmental processes are stunted in impoverished circumstances.
June 20, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Melissa Anderson, Ph.D.
The U.S. Deaf community – a minority group of 500,000 people who use American Sign Language – is one of the most understudied populations in biomedical research. This work lays the foundation for a sustainable program of research that shifts how we approach and engage the Deaf community, increasing the number of Deaf people who participate in biomedical research studies and encouraging more Deaf people to become actively engaged in the research world.
May 16, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Henry Yin, Ph.D.
Recent advances in neuroscience led to the development of a new integrative approach combining continuous quantification of behavior and selective manipulation and recording of neural activity in freely moving rodents. Recent work using this approach in my lab has yielded new insights on the relationship between neural activity and behavior. I shall summarize key results on the outputs from the basal ganglia, a set of subcortical nuclei that are critical for volitional behavior. These results suggest that the basal ganglia function as analog computing circuits, and that the relationship between neural activity and the relevant continuous behavioral variables is highly linear. These observations, which contradict textbook models of basal ganglia function as well as many traditional assumptions in neuroscience, can be explained by a hierarchical control model using multiple layers of closed loop control systems. This model has important and surprising implications for our understanding of how the brain generates behavior.
April 25, 2017, 8:00 am | NIH Campus, Wilson Hall (Bldg. 1)

Distinguished Lecturer: Mark Hayward, Ph.D.
Presentation: Reimagining the Dynamic Association between Education and US Adult Mortality in a Fast Changing Policy Environment

The 10th NIH Matilda White Riley Behavioral and Social Sciences Honors was held on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, on the NIH Campus, Wilson Hall (Bldg. 1). Mark Hayward, Ph.D, is the 2017 NIH Matilda White Riley Distinguished Lecturer. Dr. Hayward is the Professor of Sociology, Centennial Commission Professor in the Liberal Arts, and director of the Population Health Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin. His research integrates life course theory and statistical and demographic techniques to interrogate how factors from across the life course influence morbidity and mortality. Beyond extensive research on mortality, his work has examined a variety of aspects of health—including inflammation, cognitive impairment, disability, self-rated health and positive aspects of health including active life expectancy.

April 18, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Jim Spilsbury Ph.D., MPH
Health disparities are a major public health issue, and disparities in sleep quantity and quality have been well documented among disadvantaged populations. As an initial step to better understand the social setting in which adolescent sleep occurs, in the current study, we used ecological momentary assessment approaches to study the sleep and sleep environment of young African American adolescents. The study sample consisted of 26 African American or multi-ethnic early adolescent (ages 11-12 years) and parent dyads, recruited from local schools and social-service agencies in greater Cleveland, OH. Over a 14-day period, adolescents used a novel mobile-phone and motion-sensor technology to collect more accurate, real-time data about nighttime activities and sleep environments, helping pinpoint specific factors and activities influencing sleep patterns.
March 16, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Richard G. Frank, Ph.D.
This research addresses issues shaping the future of care for mental illnesses and substance use disorders, including ensuring quality of care in a system that “pays for value” and early intervention for serious mental illnesses.
February 21, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Sara Moorman, Ph.D.
This project proposes that the age composition of neighborhoods is a key contributor to health and well-being in mid- and later life. This hypothesis is suggested in part by the increasing popularity of age-restricted retirement communities, which pose an interesting puzzle for the predictions of classic social scientific theories. Sociological theorists such as Matilda White Riley suggested that age segregation is detrimental to older persons’ productivity and social integration. Yet the older persons who report the greatest satisfaction with their neighborhoods are those who live in age-restricted communities; and within naturally occurring communities, some evidence suggests that a higher proportion of older persons is associated with reduced depressive symptoms. This research offers a detailed empirical test of age stratification theory.
January 24, 2017, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Arturo Hernandez, Ph.D.
What factors affect the coding of two languages in one brain? For over 100 years, researchers have suggested that age of acquisition, language proficiency and cognitive control play a role in the neural representation of two languages. Work in the Laboratory for the Neural Bases of Bilingualism at the University of Houston has looked at the effects of all three factors on brain activity in bilinguals. This work has considered the role of age of acquisition and language proficiency on the brain activity in tasks involving speech sounds as well as the processing of grammar and meaning. In recent years, there has been renewed interest in the relationship between bilingualism and a possible advantage on non-verbal cognitive control tasks. Results from studies in my laboratory provide some evidence of a “bilingual advantage” related to cognitive control. For example, bilinguals relative to monolinguals show faster reaction times and reduced activity in brain areas devoted to cognitive control during foreign language word learning. Furthermore, more recent work reveals that bilinguals relative to monolinguals have a higher proportion of individuals carrying the A1 allele of the Taq1A polymorphism which has been associated with better task switching performance. We have also found evidence that carrier status of this gene as well as language history factors are associated with different patterns of brain activity in bilinguals. Taken together results from my laboratory suggest a complex and dynamic relationship between age of acquisition, language proficiency and cognitive control.
December 2, 2016, 8:30 am | Natcher Conference Center (Building 45)

The festival highlights exciting research results, emerging areas, and innovations in health related BSSR. This trans-NIH event enables efficient leveraging of NIH resources and expertise. The BSSR-CC members contribute diverse and comprehensive perspectives on the NIH BSSR portfolio, thus facilitating the selection of an outstanding array of research results that are highlighted at the festival.

View Recording
November 16, 2016, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Santosh Kumar, Ph.D.
For long-lasting research utility, biomedical studies often archive biospecimens in biobanks so that they can be reprocessed to take advantage of future improvements in assays and support biomedical discoveries not possible at the time of data collection. mHealth studies, on the other hand, usually collect digital biomarkers (e.g., activity counts) that are specific to the computational models adopted by respective vendors at the time of data collection. This approach prevents any future validation of these biomarkers and makes it impossible to recompute newer biomarkers. To obtain similar long-lasting research utility as biobanks, raw sensor data must be collected that can be reprocessed in future to validate prior biomarkers and to obtain newer biomarkers. Doing so is, however, challenging due to high frequency, large volume, rapid variability, and battery life limitations of sensors and smartphones.
September 29, 2016, 2:00 pm | Virtual
Presenter: Michael Hecht, Ph.D.
This webinar discusses the process of taking evidence-based practices to scale through a collaborative process that (1) includes the target audience in conceptualization and formative research that guides the design and delivery of the program, and (2) engages partners (e.g., schools, community organizations) who are key to program implementation and dissemination. Using this model of community engagement, Hecht and his business partner, Dr. Michelle Miller-Day turned keepin’ it REAL from a small research grant into one of the most widely disseminated youth drug prevention programs in the world. While this was accomplished through trial and error, several generalizable principles emerged that are the focus of this webinar. We learned that the design of interventions was not linear and could not go on without simultaneously considering implementation and dissemination. Thus the audience (e.g., youth), the venue (e.g., the school) and the implementer (e.g., teacher, D.A.R.E. Officer) must all be part of the process. This requires a careful consideration of and collaboration with the various constituencies from the start of the development process and continuing through dissemination. The webinar uses the example of how keepin’ it REAL became the basis for a profitable business venture, REAL Prevention LLC, to talk about moving from a “build it and they will come” approach to prevention to one that uses a model of community engagement. This includes discussion of the process of creating and scaling up an intervention including the challenges encountered along the way as well as the barriers to dissemination and implementation. The talk also covers strategies for other researchers interested in real-world, large-scale application that REAL Prevention has discovered during collaborations with the D.A.R.E. America, 4-H, Planned Parenthood, the Nemours Foundation, and others.